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8 New Books I’m Excited About This Fall

For me, autumn is usually a time of new school books and an increased reading load. This fall, however, marks the first year I’m not in class, and so to celebrate, I plan to use some of my free time to read for pleasure. Luckily, it seems like all my favourite authors are putting out new books this season. Some of them are out already, and some of them I’ve been waiting for for years. Here’s what’s on my to-buy to-read to-love list, in no particular order:

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1. Longbourn by Jo Baker (Random House; published October 8, 2013)

I actually just finished reading this one, and it was wonderful. Longbourn a below-stairs reimagining of Pride and Prejudice, featuring our favourite Bennets and new characters with mysterious pasts and secret ambitions. Baker creates a more complex household than seen in Austen’s work; if you like Downton Abbey, you will enjoy this novel!

 

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2. Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh (Simon & Schuster; published October 29, 2013)

It’s no secret that Hyperbole and a Half is my favourite blog. One part webcomic, one part hilarious stories, Allie Brosh illustrates the weird and embarrassing things and relatable episodes that happen to her (must-read: This is Why I’ll Never Be an Adult). Her posts about depression are honest and accessible. I’ve been excited about this book since Allie first announced it, and don’t expect to be disappointed. Hyperbole and a Half is a mix of posts that appeared on her blog and new content. Counting down the days!

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3. The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (Random House; published August 28, 2013)

This one is on my shelf, waiting to be read. A historical novel set in New Zealand, it follows a man trying to solve a number of mysterious crimes. The cover is my favourite of the season. The Luminaries has been shortlisted for the 2013 Man Booker Prize. Read it before it wins!

 

 

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4. Not Quite the Classics by Colin Mochrie (Penguin; published October 22, 2013)

I grew up watching Colin Mochrie’s comedy on TV, so when I found out he was publishing a collection of short stories, I was intrigued. In Not Quite the Classics, Mochrie takes the first and last lines of famous stories, including Dickens, Sherlock Holmes and, I’ve heard, a cameo by Doctor Who, and improvises a new and twisted middle. I’m curious to see whether his written comedy matches his wit on television.

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5. Night Film by Marisha Pessl (Random House; published August 20, 2013)

Marisha Pessl’s first novel, Special Topics in Calamity Physics (2006), was, for me, a book with a great first half and a dissatisfying ending. Despite this, I’m eager to read Pessl’s new book, a thriller about a mysterious (dead) cult filmmaker and his mysterious (dead) daughter, and the enigma that surrounds them. Postmodern and noir, Night Film contains website screenshots, news clippings and other pieces of “evidence” that propel the story. Reviews are mixed so far, but I’m hoping that it doesn’t disappoint.

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6. Allegiant by Veronica Roth (HarperCollins; published October 22, 2013)

Do I even need to say why I’m excited about this one? It’s the final book in the Divergent trilogy, and I love dystopian YA. In Allegiant, Tris ventures outside the fence with Tobias to try to discover a more peaceful life. This book is told from both Tris and Tobias’s perspective and I’m interested to find out how that affects the reader’s view of Tris and her society. Looking forward to the conclusion of this series!

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7. When Did You See Her Last? by Lemony Snicket (Little, Brown; published October 15, 2013)

My long-standing love affair with Lemony Snicket’s books (and alter ego Daniel Handler’s) extends to his new noir-style series All The Wrong Questions, of which When Did You See Her Last? is the second installment. Following a young Lemony Snicket through his V.F.D. neophyte training, this book finds Lemony searching for the missing Cleo Knight and the runaway Ellington Feint. Full of the usual incompetent adults, mysterious organizations and witty turns of phrase, When Did You See Her Last? promises to be a funny and satisfying read. Read the first two chapters here.

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8. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown; published October 22, 2013)

Donna Tartt publishes one book per decade, so everyone is very excited about The Goldfinch, her first novel since 2002. Her first book, The Secret History, was a massive bestseller and is my actual favourite book (and, as I’m sure you know, it’s hard for a book person to choose). Like all of her novels, The Goldfinch centres around death: this time, a young boy’s mother dies and he attempts to avoid being taken into a New York orphanage; he soon becomes obsessed with a mysterious painting. I’m trying to keep my expectations realistic, but I can’t wait to read Tartt’s beautiful, gothic prose again.

Let me know what you’re looking forward to reading this fall!

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